Past Champions

With our Show season in in full swing it’s really interesting to go back and look at koi handled by Dream Koi that have won Grand Supreme and Reserve Grand Supreme titles over the years gone by:It’s also interesting to see what other titles some of these stunning koi have won:-


Still alive and well and way over 90cm!


























I’ve always had a soft spot for Chagois.I think it’s a combination of their strength and simplicity.There is always a place for a chagoi in a pond. They get extremely tame/friendly and greedy ,so will often encourage the other koi in the pond to feed more profusely.

I’ve found that Ogata Koi Farm producers some extremely good Chagois.

I purchased these 2 Nisai at the Ogata November Auction in 2012 with Paul Coetzee
who shares my passion for this variety. Both koi are in my Champion’s pond.

This fish is now only 3,5 years old and over 85cm,

classic strong body and great, even scalation/ colour.

This Chagoi is more chocolate and is over 80cm and has developed a lot of character
in her face with distinctive chubby cheeks-Paul’s favorite! Won’t be as big as the other-imo- but is still stunning!
I am sure Paul will be showing at least one of them at the KZN Show in July and I will then get updates on pictures and sizes.

2 other stunning Ogata Chagois:-
A beautiful Chagoi grown by Ernst from Nisai to win some coveted awards.
Mark bought this Chagoi from Dream Koi who grew it on frm nisai to an 80cm Sansai. Mark has put another 7cm onto the koi and I’m sure we will see this fish do something special at the Western Cape Show later this year.



Filter upgrade to indoor champions pond

With the high cost of electricity and also to minimize the maintenance, but to increase the effectiveness of the filters, I decided to make some changes to my filter system:-


I removed all the koi and blocked the bottom drains- I left the water running in the pond with the weirs directly connected to the protein skimmer and bakki shower. I then did the foundations for the filtration system.
The finished filter- 2 bottom drains to 1 Profidrum- thank you Mark from Koi Water Products!- and the 3rd bottom drain and 2 weirs to the other drum. From the drums the water goes through 3 filter chambers of Japanese matting- up/down system. The 4th chamber is the pump chamber where 2 x 55 00 liters an hour submersables push the water up and through 2 large stainless steel bakki showers filled with Momotaro Bakki House Media and then back to the pond. In addition I have a Speck pump pushing water through a sand filter and UV light and returning through my inside bakki shower with Ogata Crystal Bio.

One of the 3 Japanese mat filters

Pump chamber

Twin outside bakki showers

100 ton Champions pond- plenty of oxygen!

OFS Grand champion

After Hannes’s success with the OFS GC I looked up the Sanke to see how much she had changed from when I purchased her as nisai from Sakai to now:-

The most interesting change has been the sumi quantity and the beni quality- made a huge difference to the koi!

Koi Carp

Congratulations to Ernst Van Dyk for having his pond featured in the very popular British koi magazine Koi Carp.

As most of you know, Ernst is an extremely passionate koi keeper with the ability to grow a number of koi big- and still maintain the quality- in a relativly small pond. The cover of the magazine shows a very beautiful Sakai Sanke which we purchased as nisai in November 2012 and subsiquently sold to Ernst.

It’s great to see that Ernst is doing such a good job on the koi and I’m looking forward to see her progress.

Koi Carp cover


As nisai in November 2012


2014 OFS Show

The Show Chairman Bennie Herbst next to the
Show banner- congratulations to Bennie and
his team for putting on a great Show in a new venue.

The Judges

 Well done again to Hannes for winning Grand Champion. This year with a stunning Dream Koi Sakai Sanke- the quality of this koi is extremely high and has a fantastic future.
He also won Supreme size 7 with a striking Momotaro Kohaku.

In addition he also won Jumbo A with another Sakai Sanke
And Jumbo B with an 80cm Ogata Ogon.










A video of 3 Ogata Ogons bought by Dream Koi as nisai and grown on in our new pond. Hannes’s ogon – the bigger of these 3 -grew from 55cm to 80cm in just under 2 years.

Reserve Grand Champion was a strong Sakai Kohaku supplied by Dream Koi to Bennie Herbst- well done Bennie- he also won Supreme 6 with a lovley Ogata Shusui

26cm Tosai
Junior Grand Champion

2014 Southern Cape show

Well done to Drikus van Dyk for winning Grand Champion and Mature Champion at the Southern Cape Show.

Drikus collecting his Grand Champion trophy. Very well earned!

Drikus has done a great job to bring on this Dream Koi supplied Sakai Big Rose Sanke so well- the body in particular is magnificent! He won Supreme size 8 with this Sanke in 2012 and now Grand!


Sakai 2013 Autumn Auction


Checking the amazing nisai before the start of the Auction


Kentaro giving Tani a look at one of the nisai Sankes


Kentaro showing off an impressive nisai Kohaku


A “dissapointed” bidder – Ryuki sees the funny side!


The Auction party is always a fun occasion. Kentaro talking to Ryuki and Kiki- Samurai Koi


Takaharu -Beppu Fish Farm- an ex employee good friend of Kentaro.


Dream Koi will be back in Japan to buy a lot more stock between to 2nd and 9th of November.Watch the blog for updates and pictures of our travels.


Momotaro 2013 Autumn auction

Once again the Momotaro Auction did not fail to impress with a lot of stunning koi on offer:-

Maeda san inspecting some of the Sansai with Japanese dealers


Viewing the next koi to be auctioned with Paul Ashton- Koi Bito


Daisuke running the Auction with Chinese translator


Nisai Goshiki – one of the koi bought by Dream Koi
Ryuki-Naita Koi Farm- and Odawara -Odakan.Always a strong presents at the Auctions





Choosing a Champion

It was just before my 2011 November trip to Japan that Mark Colyn got hold of me and asked me to select two special gosanke Koi from Sakai Fish Farm in Hiroshima. Of course he wanted these Koi to be able to compete at our Koi shows in South Africa.   Sensibly Mark was not prepared to spend the amount of money it would take to buy an All Japan winner.

The process of looking for a “show winning “Koi is not straight forward. One has to firstly have a very good relationship with the breeder to be introduced to such Koi and also to trust his judgement regarding how the judges will view these fish – not just on the day, but in the future when it develops.
Sakai has undoubtedly the best Sankes and Kohakus in Japan – his show record speaks for itself. So to find high quality at his farm is not too difficult, but to find it at an affordable price-remember we are spending rands now – and be confident ZNA judges will look favourably at them is not easy!
Kentaro Sakai has what many of us would consider a highly enviable job, however one has to think of  the pressure he has on him to keep producing the quality gosanke his farm is famous for, and to ensure that they keep winning at the top shows in the world.  For the prices he charges for his top end Koi, his customers have huge expectations!  Remember, there can only be one All Japan Grand Champion each year and he has a number of loyal customers all looking for this Koi, who are prepared to spend excessive amounts of money to acquire it. Needless to say he has a stressful time juggling these customers.
Regarding pricing, once a potential Koi is chosen or offered, Kentaro will have to consider:-
a) How much money the customer would be able to afford,
 b) How much could he potentially get from another customer for the same Koi?
c) How much future business will the customer potentially be bringing in, or is this a one off deal,
 d) Is the Koi going to stay at his farm and compete in Japan-more responsibility/risk and pressure for him than if it is going to be shipped?
Based on these directives I assured Kentaro San that I had already done a lot of business with Sakai Fish Farm over the last 8 years making the long journey to Japan at least twice every year. My customer was very supportive.  I was looking to keep the Koi at the farm for just one more year and while my customer would love to show the Koi in Japan, he was realistically more interested in showing in South Africa. Finally, if Sakai Koi do well in the South African shows then it means good advertising for Sakai and me for future business.
Once we had had our preliminary conversation and we understood one another, he took me to his “first class” pond. Mark had decided on going for nisai (2 year old Koi) because at this age the Koi are reasonably stable and one can judge quite accurately as to their future potential, but the cost is a lot less than an older Koi of the same quality. Here it gets very interesting because these selected Koi are all good, but they vary in price dramatically depending on certain small variables. For example, in Asia -where the vast majority of the high end dealers/customers come from – a lot of value is put on certain patterns. For example, they love maruten and “flowery”, unusual patterns.
I focused on the Koi with less “complicated” patterns. I began with the sanke. Being 3 colours it is a bit trickier to select than a Kohaku. In the Sanke I went for a Koi from a good parent and one with a strong body and skin and with pronounced sumi in the right areas. I was happy with a simple, but balanced and attractive pattern. I selected a Koi which stood out in the pond. I have to say that I chose this Koi as a “marker”, not expecting the price to be within budget. When Kentaro gave me the price I was very pleasantly surprised and immediately asked him to reserve the Koi – knowing full well that if Mark did not like the Koi/price I was more than prepared to take it as stock.
We then went on to the Kohaku.The Kohaku ended up taking a lot more time. Kentaro first presented me with his choice of Koi within the price budget, but I was not happy with his selection. In Japan it is not polite to say no outright, so one must be “subtle” in declining an offer saying something like “Very nice Koi, but can we also look at another one?” After “declining” a few offers I decided to personally select a Koi.  I chose a slightly smaller Koi, but one with an imposing body, great shiroji and soft beni. Once again the pattern was simple but well balanced, with the large front step adding to the strong looking body. The price was too high, but I then said I would consider taking both Koi at a slightly reduced price, after some deliberation and a lot of “pleading” he finally accepted. Fortunately Mark loved both Koi.
The Koi went into Sakai’s mud ponds for the summer and were harvested in Autumn-October. I received an e mail from Kentaro with pictures of the 2 Koi to say that they had both progressed really well and he wanted to offer Mark the opportunity to show the Koi in the “International  ZNA Koi  Show” in Kobe during November. Of course this was a very pleasant surprise and Mark understandably jumped at the opportunity. I made sure that my plans to visit Japan coincided with the show dates.
When I arrived in Japan about 2 weeks before the Show I went straight to Sakai and asked to see the Koi. Both fish were being kept in Kentaro’s private fish house with the other Koi selected to go to the show. In this house the water quality is superb and the fish are “groomed” for the major shows. I was very keen to see the Koi, but did not want to disturb them too much, so I just viewed them in a floating bowl. I could see straight away that they had progressed remarkably well in size and quality- especially the Kohaku, although the bigger Sanke was still my personal favourite.


I was really looking forward to the Show. On the day the weather was typically terrible with pouring rain. Sakai alone had entered 50 Koi, bought to the show in transport vats in 3 trucks. The quality of the Koi was excellent. I had no idea in which vats the Koi were, so I went through them all. It was interesting to be able to immediately notice the vats containing the Sakai Koi. The average koi’s body shape and lustre was a level above the other Koi – we are talking gosanke of course!


The first Koi I found was the Sanke. She had travelled well and was looking great, but unfortunately no prize! I felt a bit disappointed, but 70bu is an extremely competitive class and Sakai had bought a number of Sankes to the Show in this size group.
My disappointment quickly subsided when I found the Kohaku- 1st in 65bu Kohakus and 2nd overall in her size group – an amazing result!!

A stunning trophy and certificates to keep and cherish-

The next bit of “excitement” was shipping the Koi home a few weeks after the Show

Collecting the koi shipment at OR Tambo.

After that the pair had to go through quarantine at Dream Koi’s farm.

Comfortable in their 90 ton qt pond

“Betsy” rising above her Sakai pond companions.

. Fortunately the shipping and quarantining went smoothly and it was not too long and Olympia and Betsy were happily residing in Dream Koi’s 100ton indoor pond!

Great to see South Africa represented in the winners list in the Nichirin magazine-well done Mark!!